Support for Pupils with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) in Mainstream Schools

* Update to Element 3 Changes to top-up funding for children with SEND attending mainstream schools in Warrington

How does the SEND 0-25 Years Code of Practice identify Special Educational Needs?

“A child or young person has SEN if they have a learning difficulty or disability which calls for
special educational provision to be made for him or her. A child of compulsory school age or a young person has a learning difficulty or disability if he or she:

• has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age

• has a disability which prevents or hinders him or her from making use of facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the same age in mainstream schools or mainstream post 16 institutions.”

Children and young people with medical needs

The Department for Education has published guidance detailing what schools must do to support pupils with medical needs.

Supporting Pupils at School with Medical Conditions, Department for Education (2015)

Support for disabled children and young people

The Equality Act 2010 sets out the legal obligations that schools have towards disabled children and young people. The SEN Code of Practice details some of the duties placed on schools.

Guidance and advice is available in the following publications:

Equality Act 2010: Advice for schools, Department for Education

Reasonable Adjustments for disabled pupils, Human Rights Commission (2012)

All Schools publish a SEN Information report which details information on how they identify and support learners with SEN. This includes the following information:

· policies for identifying children and young people with SEN and assessing their needs, including the name and contact details of the SENCO (mainstream schools)

· arrangements for consulting parents of children with SEN and involving them in their child’s education

· arrangements for consulting young people with SEN and involving them in their education

· arrangements for assessing and reviewing children and young people’s progress towards outcomes. This should include the opportunities available to work with parents and young people as part of this assessment and review

· arrangements for supporting children and young people in moving between phases of education and in preparing for adulthood. As young people prepare for adulthood outcomes should reflect their ambitions, which could include higher education, employment, independent living and participation in society

· the approach to teaching children and young people with SEN

· how adaptations are made to the curriculum and the learning environment of children and young people with SEN

· the expertise and training of staff to support children and young people with SEN, including how specialist expertise will be secured

· evaluating the effectiveness of the provision made for children and young people with SEN

· how children and young people with SEN are enabled to engage in activities available for those children and young people in the school who do not have SEN

· support for improving emotional and social development. This should include extra pastoral support arrangements for listening to the views of children and young people with SEN and measures to prevent bullying

· how the school involves other bodies, including health and social care bodies, local authority support services and voluntary sector organisations, in meeting children and young people’s SEN and supporting their families

· arrangements for handling complaints from parents of children with SEN about the provision made at the school

School funding to support learners with SEN

All mainstream schools have an amount identified within their overall budget called the notional budget for SEN. This is not a ring-fenced amount and it is for the school to provide high quality appropriate support from the whole of its budget. Schools are expected to provide additional support at element 2.

Element 2 is a nationally prescribed amount which is currently £6,000 and is in addition to Element 1.

Funding to support the needs of learners with SEN follows a national system. In mainstream schools funding is made up of 3 elements. Not all children and young people with SEN will need support from all 3 elements.

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What does high quality provision look like for mainstream education settings to enable them to meet the needs of children and young people with SEN from their delegated funding?

High quality teaching that is differentiated and personalised to meet the individual needs of the majority of children and young people.

Some children and young people need educational provision that is different from, or additional to, that normally available to pupils of the same age. It is the responsibility of all practitioners working with the child to be proactive in tailoring the provision to meet the child or young person’s individual needs.

In Warrington we aim to support children and young people to be educated in local mainstream settings wherever possible.

Provision for Elements 1 and 2 from own budget

The table below identifies guidance to the provision that mainstream schools are expected to ensure is available for pupils with Special Educational Needs and when it is appropriate to apply for top up funding or consideration to commence a statutory assessment for an Education Health and Care Plan.

Warrington Borough Council expects schools to consult this guidance alongside the SEN and Disability Code of Practice 0-25 (2014) when identifying pupil’s level of Special Educational Needs and the duties schools have in meeting these needs.

SEN Support - Element 2

Targeted interventions equating to £6,000 as defined in the Costed Provision Map

This level of support is available within the resources held by the school without the need for an EHC Plan. Schools will be able to provide quality first teaching and targeted individual/group support in specific areas of need. Schools will be required to show that they have followed relevant professional advice and used their own resources to meet a pupil’s needs, reviewing the success of such programmes and making appropriate adjustments when necessary.

Below are examples of the provision that would be appropriate at this level from the school’s delegated funding. These lists are not exhaustive.

Interventions
Cognition and Learning Communication and Interaction Sensory and/or Physical Needs Social, Emotional and Mental Health

Modification and differentiation of curriculum planning, delivery, resources and materials.

Strategies to enhance the communication environment.

All reasonable adjustments made for the pupil to access the curriculum and environment according to the Equality Act 2010 and reasonable adjustments advice from the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC).

Strategies to focus on difficulties during unstructured times which impact on learning opportunities and access to the curriculum.

Implementation of specialist advice for school staff on how to enable full access to the curriculum. This would include appropriate specific programmes to enhance learning and accelerate progress accessed on a regular basis.

Implementation of an individual communication programme and / or strategies from a Speech & Language Therapist

The Children and Families Act 2014 places a duty on maintained schools and academies to make arrangements for pupils with medical needs with regard to the statutory guidance ‘Supporting pupils at school with medical conditions’. Complete and follow advice gathered from an environmental audit making all reasonable adjustments for pupils with sensory, physical and medical requirements.

Programmes to develop:

  • Appropriate social skills
  • Empathy and awareness of the needs of others
  • Ability to maintain attention
  • Emotional  regulation
  • Coping strategies for dealing with difficult situations
  • Independence in a learning environment

Assistance with recording for some curriculum areas. Alternative methods of recording written work including provision of appropriate software and note taking devices.

Implementation of strategies advised by an Educational Psychologist or Specialist Teacher to support pupil’s with Social Communication difficulties / Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Implementation of strategies advised by specialist VI / HI Teachers, Occupational Therapists / Physiotherapists.

Support to develop a sense of danger and skills for personal safety.

Use of multi-sensory strategies to support learning with opportunities for over learning.

Use of visual timetable and visual prompts.

Some modification of resources and materials.

Key worker to support transitions

Some specialist qualified dyslexia teaching either 1-1 or within a small group. With specialist advice shared with the Class Teacher.

Support for personal development /self-help and independence.

Strategies to develop organisational skills.

Risk assessment carried out.

Whole school trained in Quality First Teaching (QFT) for dyslexia e.g. through the Inclusion Development Programme (IDP) and government led initiatives.

Support to manage transitions through a specified programme or specific strategies

Support to reinforce health professional programmes and health care plans.

Social factors identified and Early Help process undertaken if appropriate.

Regular SMART target setting and monitoring of performance targets.

Strategies to develop attention / concentration skills.

Use of multi-sensory strategies.

Quality First Teaching advice implemented.

Use of advanced training materials.

Support during unstructured times and some curriculum work to understand and follow instructions.

Support to develop fine and gross motor skills.

Social and emotional learning embedded and implemented throughout school.

Advice sought and implemented from Inclusion Development Programme (IDP) for SALT / ASC.

Strategies to promote self-help / independence skills. Access to a safe space to calm down when needed.

Modification of language used to simplify and break down instructions.

Pupil may have demonstrated difficulty with emotional regulation and well-being and been referred to CAMHS service or Community Paediatrician by the school or by parent or young person (if over 16).

Access to a meet and greet at the beginning of the school day.

Access to an identified area when feeling anxious or upset.

Whole school trained in QFT for SALT and Social Communication difficulties / Autistic Spectrum Disorder / Condition.

Children with complex special needs page 1

* Update to Element 3

Schools are not expected to fund all the costs where a child or young person has complex needs that require greater support than identified in the table above in order to make progress.

Element 3 funding is provided for this by the local authority to top up funding in addition to the schools spending of £6,000

Schools may request additional financial support through the following routes:

Top up funding without a plan (Element 3)

Schools may request additional support via top up funding without a plan. Top up funding via this route is agreed for a maximum of 2 years to support schools to put in place provision to enable the child or young person make accelerated progress.

This funding should be reviewed after the first year to monitor its effectiveness. At this point the funding could cease. At the end of Year 2 the funding will be reviewed and, if appropriate, ceased, reviewed or escalated to an EHC referral.

Funding can be allocated at;

3.1 £1,500
3.2 £3,000
3.3 £4,500
3.4 £6,000

Parents must be made aware that this is not a request for an EHC needs assessment by the school before the request is submitted.

Top up funding with an EHC plan (Element 3) (1-3)

Top up funding with a plan will provide additional funding to support the school to implement the provision identified in the plan. The provision in the plan is reviewed annually through the statutory annual review. Request for this funding is via the same process for an EHC.

Request for an EHC needs assessment can be made by the school or by parents directly using the forms here

Tables to show provision from Top Up Funding at Element 3

Top Up Element 3.1

Top up can be provided at this level without the need for an EHC Plan

Targeted interventions equating to £6000 plus an additional £1500 top up as defined in the Costed Provision Map

Interventions
Cognition and Learning Communication and Interaction Sensory and/or Physical Needs Social, Emotional and Mental Health

Ongoing support as identified in element 2 above. In addition to:

Ongoing support as identified in element 2 above. In addition to:

All appropriate adjustments and adaptations made in line with the statutory guidance and Children and Families Act 2014 as identified above.

Ongoing support as identified in element 2 above in addition to:

Modification and differentiation required of the majority of curriculum planning, delivery, resources and materials.

Specific / targeted and visual strategies to enhance the communication environment throughout the day.

Support to implement mobility and health care plans.

Individualised support programmes as advised by an Educational Psychologist or other specialist professionals in social, emotional and / or mental health difficulties.

Implementation of specialist advice for school staff on how to enable full access to the curriculum. This would include appropriate specific programmes to enhance learning and accelerate progress accessed on a regular basis.

Support to facilitate effective communication, interaction, curriculum access and personal and emotional development throughout the majority of the day.

Use of multi-sensory strategies.

Access to a named Key Worker / Learning Mentor.

Assistance with recording for a number of curriculum areas.

Support to manage transitions through a specified programme or specific strategies.

Support to develop fine and gross motor skills.

Integrated home-school support plan.

Alternative methods of recording written work including provision of appropriate software and note-taking devices.

Access to a meet and greet / debrief at the beginning and / or end of the school day.

Strategies or support to promote self-help / independence skills.

Completion of Risk Assessments and implementation of associated plans, which are regularly reviewed and updated to manage well-being.

Significantly differentiated curriculum for language based lessons.

Access to an identified area when feeling anxious or upset.

Sensory environmental audit completed and appropriate adaptations made.

Support to develop social skills using adult intervention to structure learning situations.

Implementation of an individual communication programme and / or strategies from a Speech & Language Therapist reviewed on a termly basis.

Modification of resources and materials to access curriculum subjects.

Access to nurture group / base.

Implementation of advice and strategies advised by an Educational Psychologist to support pupil’s with Social Communication Difficulties / Autistic

Frequent specialist external or qualified HI or VI specialist teacher advice and occasional input.

Early Help may be in place and regularly reviewed to support the child / young person and their family or a referral may be needed.

Spectrum Disorder reviewed at least on a termly basis.

Guidance and support from Occupational Therapy / Physiotherapy services / HI / VI Specialist teachers.

A referral for support with mental health and emotional well-being should be considered if appropriate.

Children with complex special educational needs page 2

* Update to Element 3

Top Up Element 3.2

Top up can be provided at this level without the need for an EHC Plan

Targeted interventions equating to £6000 plus an additional £3000 top up as defined in the Costed Provision Map

Interventions
Cognition and Learning Communication and Interaction Sensory and/or Physical Needs Social, Emotional and Mental Health

Individualised curriculum provided for the pupil for most of the day.

Assistive or Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) needed.

Implementation of physical / sensory related programmes on a daily basis.

Ongoing support as identified above.

Frequent specialist advice or regular input for school staff on how to enable full access to the curriculum and provide support for most of the curriculum or skill areas and / or task analysis, differentiated activities and resources in small groups / 1:1 situations OR smaller classes.

Pupil may use Makaton / Picture Exchange System to communicate wants and needs.

Support for mobility and healthcare plans.

Alternative support programmes and / or environments identified for pupils to access during unstructured times if required.

Assistance with and / or alternative recording provided for most curriculum areas.

Support to facilitate effective communication, interaction and curriculum access / personal development.

Multi-sensory delivery of some of the curriculum.

Regular access to a nurture group.

Identified staffing needed to significantly differentiate the curriculum to enable access.

Support to ensure understanding of most instructions and tasks.

Strategies to support fine and gross motor skills.

Anger Management programme in place

Significant modification of most curriculum resources and materials.

Support to develop attention and concentration skills for most of the day.

Guidance and support to develop self-help and independence skills.

Anxiety levels monitored and alternatives provided.

Frequent advice and occasional input from SLT or staff with relevant expertise to train school staff in Assistive Communication.

Frequent specialist external or qualified HI or VI specialist teacher advice and regular input.

Programme/strategies built into the daily curriculum to develop self-awareness and monitor emotional well-being.

Specific / targeted and visual strategies to enhance the communication environment throughout the day

Meet and greet at the beginning of the school day, support for transitions and time to discuss any difficulties experienced at the end of the school day.

Access to a quiet break out space to calm down when needed. Pass to come in early at break times if needed.

An Early Help offer may be in place or the pupil may have been identified as a child in need or a Child in Care.

Pupil may have ongoing support from the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) to monitor their mental health and well-being.

Children with complex special educational needs page 3

*Update to Element 3

Top Up Element 3.3

EHC Plan may be required at this level

Targeted interventions equating to £6000 plus an additional £4500 top up as defined in the Costed Provision Map

Interventions
Cognition and Learning Communication and Interaction Sensory and/or Physical Needs Social, Emotional and Mental Health

Individualised curriculum provided for the pupil for structured parts of the day. This may require full time curriculum support with significant differentiation in all lessons.

Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) needed (e.g. communication aid with occasional programming / updating).

Implementation of Physical and / or Sensory related programmes on a daily basis.

Ongoing support as identified in Elements 2 and Elements 3A and 3B above.

Frequent specialist advice and frequent input for school staff on how to enable full access to the curriculum and provide support for all of the curriculum

Pupil may use Makaton / Picture Exchange System to communicate wants and needs.

Moving and Handling plans, Care plan and Mobility programmes in place.

Support to develop social skills using adult intervention to structure learning situations both within the curriculum and during unstructured times.

Assistance with and alternative recording methods needed for most / all curriculum area.

Support to facilitate effective communication, interaction and curriculum access / personal development throughout the day.

Multi-sensory delivery of most of the curriculum.

Multi-agency support may be in place through Early Help, or the pupil may be identified as a Child in Need or Child in Care.

Identified staffing to support access to the curriculum for most / all of the day.

Support to develop attention and concentration skills throughout the day.

Strategies to maintain fine and gross motor skills integrated throughout the day.

Pupil may have ongoing support from CAMHS team to monitor their mental health and well-being.

Significant modification of all curriculum resources and materials.

Frequent advice and regular input from Speech & Language Therapist / and / or Specialist Teachers with relevant expertise.

Assistance with self-help and independence skills.

Specific / targeted and visual strategies to enhance the communication environment throughout the day.

Frequent specialist external or qualified HI or VI specialist teacher advice and frequent input.

Sensory diet in place requiring significant adaptation of the curriculum in line with Occupational Therapy advice.

Communication through Braille and the tactile curriculum for some of the day.

A communicator may be required to support for a significant part of the school day.

Children with complex special educational needs page 4

*Update to Element 3

Top Up Element 3.4

EHC Plan is required at this level which would include the tailored strategies and recommendations from an Educational Psychologist report

Targeted interventions equating to £6000 plus an additional £6000 top up as defined in the Costed Provision Map

Interventions
Cognition and Learning Communication and Interaction Sensory and/or Physical Needs Social, Emotional and Mental Health

Individualised curriculum provided for the pupil during structured and unstructured times throughout the whole school day.

Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) needed (e.g. communication aid with regular programming / updating).

Implementation of professional programmes to support physical / sensory needs throughout the day.

Ongoing support as identified in elements 2, 3A, 3B and 3C.

Significant modification of curriculum resources and materials (e.g. modified text).

Pupil may use Makaton / Picture Exchange System to communicate wants and needs.

Moving and Handling plans, Health Care plan and Mobility programmes in place.

Additional support to implement crisis management plan.

Identified staffing to support access to the curriculum or personal development throughout the day.

Access to communication support through a specified programme to facilitate effective communication and interaction throughout the day.

Multi-sensory delivery of the whole curriculum and throughout the day.

Support at unstructured times promoting social skills and awareness of danger.

Assistance with and / or alternative recording methods for all curriculum areas.

Support to develop attention and concentration skills throughout the day.

Strategies to maintain fine and gross motor skills.

Specific targeted, individual support during the day as a result of a risk assessment

Ongoing specialist advice / training for school staff on how to enable full access to the curriculum.

Frequent advice and regular input from SLT and staff with relevant expertise in Speech Language Communication difficulties and Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Supported self-help and independence skills.

Targeted, individual work to support withdrawn and isolated behaviour which may be as a result of an underlying mental health difficulty such as anxiety / depression.

Additional 1:1 support within small specialist teaching groups.

Advised strategies from professionals put into place to manage potential self-harming behaviours

Implementation of multi-disciplinary support for personal care for some of the day.

Frequent specialist external or qualified HI or VI specialist teacher advice and / or input.

Communication through Braille / sign language facilitated during the school day.

Top Up Funding Request Forms

Top Up Funding Request - Primary

Top Up Funding Request - Secondary

If you require further information, please contact the Inclusion Team on 01925 442917

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